'El Chapo' Drug Kingpin Found GUILTY on All Charges by Brooklyn Jury

'El Chapo' Drug Kingpin Found GUILTY on All Charges by Brooklyn Jury

El Chapo is now facing life in maximum security prison after a jury consisting of five men and seven women revealed the verdict to the three-month-long trial. He will spend the rest of life in prison now that he has been convicted.

Guzman, 61, was extradited to the U.S.in 2017 after Mexican authorities captured him a year prior during raids in Los Mochis, Sinaloa.

Guzman sat and showed no emotion while the verdict was read. Once the jury left the room, he and his wife put their hands to their hearts and gave each other the thumbs up sign.

The tension at times was cut by some of the trial's sideshows, such as the sight of Guzman and his wife, Emma Coronel Aispuro, showing up in matching burgundy velvet blazers in a gesture of solidarity.

Likewise, the trial involved the twice-daily closing of the Brooklyn Bridge to ensure safe passage for the for the parade of government vehicles transporting El Chapo from the prison to the courthouse.

The prosecution's case against Guzman, a roughly 5½-foot figure whose nickname translates to "Shorty", included the testimony of former associates and other witnesses.

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Accused Mexican drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman is seen with a handgun on display during a testimony by Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) agent Victor Vazquez (not shown) in this courtroom sketch in Brooklyn federal court in New York City on January 17, 2019. He did not try to deny his crimes, but instead had his lawyers argue he was merely a fall guy for corrupt government officials guilty of far worse wrongdoing that him.

Estimates of how much money Guzman made from drugs vary. It later dropped him from the list, saying it was too hard to quantify his assets.

The most shocking allegation came from Guzman's former top aide Alex Cifuentes, who accused former Mexican president Enrique Pena Nieto of taking a $100 million bribe from Guzman. Another day, a Chapo-size actor who played the kingpin in the TV series "Narcos: Mexico" came to watch, telling reporters that seeing the defendant flash him a smile was "surreal".

Despite Guzman's downfall, the Sinaloa Cartel still has the biggest US distribution presence of Mexican cartels, followed by the fast-growing Jalisco New Generation Cartel, according to the US Drug Enforcement Administration.

The global notoriety of Guzman was boosted by two escapes from Mexican custody, one in 2001 and another one in 2015 - through a 1.5km underground tunnel large enough to ride a motorcycle. Cogan says it made him "very proud to be an American".

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